Changing Suns Books


Killing King Abacus Anthology

By Killing King Abacus

Paperback | 308 pp. | 6 x 9 in | May 2016
ISBN: ISBN: 978-0-9951551-0-7

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e-book

PDF, EPUB and MOBI | May 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9951551-4-5

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New introductions by sasha k, Leila and Wolfi Landstreicher plus an anthology introduction Chris Kortright.

This is an anthology of the writing tied to Killing King Abacus. Killing King Abacus was started as a writing project to challenge aspects of discourse and practices within the North American anarchist scene by three individuals Leila, sasha k and Wolfi Landstreicher. One of the central challenges of this project was to think through/explore “insurrectionary anarchism” as a practice/process. This anthology spans a time between 2000-2005 covering Killing King Abacus #1 and #2; Hot Tide Bulletin which is comprised of anti-authoritarian/anti-capitalist analysis; an exchange between sasha k and Chris Dixon debating/dialoging issues of organization; the role of “activists” and “political experts”; a collection of letters and articles in other publication that where in response to or in discussion with the larger Killing King Abacus project.­

 


A Labour of Liberation

A Labour of Liberation

A Labour of Liberation

by Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay

Paperback | 76 pp. | 4.5 x 7 in | May 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9951551-1-4

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e-book

PDF, EPUB, MOBU | May 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9951551-3-8

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Providing care to the sick is one of the most universal labours that exists across human societies. How do we understand the work that goes into this vital collective task? How do we arrange different forms of caregiving labour? How do we decide what forms of labour remain informal and unregulated, while others remains more controlled and institutionalised? What has led to the way we prioritise and the way we value caregiving labour types?  This work explores the forms of labour – from the cognitive to the emotional, from the physical to the administrative – that go into contemporary healthcare, tracing the lineage of the hierarchies that have developed in alliance or complicity with state and capital. Through analysing the repercussions of these relationships on the care of the sick, the book questions the role of coercion and extraction in health work, and poses an argument for a more liberatory future for caregiving labour.

Praise:

In A Labour of Liberation, Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay offers a doctor’s engagement with the tangled politics of healthcare today, struggling to imagine a care that does not perpetuate inequality and structural violence. It starts with recognizing that we are all healthcare workers, and that the tendency to think of medicine as technical reinforces privilege and ignorance. But then what? How deep would the change have to go? Based on an amazingly helpful bibliography of radical thought around healthy societies, the answer is far beyond what is comfortable for him, for us, for society. But we stay with the trouble. This is required reading for anyone in the healthcare industry and who thinks they are critical of it.
         — Joseph Dumit author of Drugs for Life: How Pharmaceutical Companies Define Our Health and Picturing Personhood: Brain Scans and Biomedical Identity

 

Interview Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay

“A Labour of Liberation”: An interview with author Baijayanta Mukhopadhyay, Part 1 at Rank&File.ca

Book Reviews:

How do we care for each other?: 'A Labour of Liberation' provides radical insight into health and medicine
Review by Scott Neigh for rabble.ca


The Tragedy of Common Sense

The Tragedy of Common Sense

The Tragedy of Common Sense

by John P. Clark

Paperback | 128 pp. | 4.5 x 7 in | August 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9951551-2-1

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PDF, EPUB, MOBU | August 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9951551-5-2

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Introduction by Salvatore Engel-Di Mauro
Foreword by Ariel Salleh

This book takes as its object of critique one of the best known and most influential arguments in contemporary applied ethics which is biologist Garrett Hardin’s case for “lifeboat ethics.” John Clark analyzes the moral dimensions of world hunger, foreign aid, immigration policy, and population growth. Clark critiques the “lifeboat ethics” as a way to explore in depth both the common and the commons.  It is about the truth we hold in common, and about certain falsehoods that we hold in common.

This book also contains Garrett Hardin’s 1974 essay "Living on a Lifeboat"

 

Praise:

"John Clark has written a cool, water-tight refutation of the 'life-boat ethics' of Garret Hardin.  He marshals the facts and develops the arguments which incontrovertibly falsify the dog-eat-dog thesis of Hardin and reveals it as nothing other than the specious, colonizing ideology of the selfish interests of the One Per Cent!"
       — Peter Linebaugh, author of The Magna Carta Manifesto: Liberties and Commons for All and Stop Thief!: The Commons, Enclosures, and Resistance

 

"Garrett Hardin's famous writings on what might be called the ecology of poverty and wealth have largely escaped in-depth criticism despite how badly they have been constructed and how harmful are their social implications. Happily, the epoch of benign neglect has come to an end with John Clark’s detailed and powerful critique of Hardin. Reading it, one wonders all the more how this false prophet managed to cast so long a shadow for so long a time. And surely, ruthless criticism of such excellence will prepare the way for an epoch in which the Commons will be a space of victory and not of tragedy."
       — Joel Kovel, Editor-In-Chief of Capitalism, Nature, Socialism and author of The Enemy of Nature: The End of Capitalism or the End of the World?